Furr's falls to make way for Peter Piper Pizza

Demolition crews are bringing down the former Furr's Cafeteria, methodically separating out steel building materials for salvage.
  • HOW MANY TRUCKLOADS OF DEBRIS DOES IT TAKE TO DEMOLISH FURR'S FAMILY DINING?* SO FAR:

    • 25: loads of brick

    • 15: loads of iron

    • 5: loads of rubble

    • 1: load of trees

    *Numbers as of Monday afternoon

    Source: ...

  • SHOW ALL »
  • HOW MANY TRUCKLOADS OF DEBRIS DOES IT TAKE TO DEMOLISH FURR'S FAMILY DINING?* SO FAR:

    • 25: loads of brick

    • 15: loads of iron

    • 5: loads of rubble

    • 1: load of trees

    *Numbers as of Monday afternoon

    Source: Steven Williams, owner and operator of Axis Demolition

Piles of debris cluttered the ground Monday, while a demolished exterior exposed the ceiling lamps and serving line inside what was once Furr's Family Dining.

Demolition continues at the site, 3603 N. Navarro St., as Peter Piper Pizza prepares to call the place home.

Victoria-based Axis Demolition began July 9, salvaging restaurant equipment and the like, said Steven Williams, Axis' owner and operator. The actual demolition began Saturday.

He said he expected the building to be gone by Friday, with the slab taking another two to three days.

The work meant truckloads of debris leaving the worksite daily, but Williams said only trash went to the landfill. Metal was sold, he explained, while concrete was crushed for streets and bricks were reused.

"We're a green company," Williams said. "We recycle everything."

Construction on Peter Piper Pizza is scheduled to begin later this month. Once completed, the 12,000-square-foot restaurant and game room will include two dining rooms, high ceilings, mosaic tiles and stainless steel counters, according to a Peter Piper news release.

Peter Piper Pizza is scheduled to open early next year.

As for the demolition, the work might mean long days for the five-person team, but there's one person who simply doesn't leave. Williams lives in an on-site RV, and will remain there until the job is done.

It takes dedication, he said, but it's worth it to keep a job running smoothly.

"It's gone great," Williams said.