Letter had wrong perspective on Scripture

Editor, the Advocate:

I'm writing in response to a letter in the March 11 Advocate. In this letter, the writer asserts that a respondent to Pastor Fisher's Saturday sermon is calling the truth "hate." I disagree with that assertion.

In his sermon, the pastor repeatedly refers to "secular humanists," inferring that they are the "enemy" of Christians. Secular humanists is a catchphrase used by a religious movement called dominionism, which, at its core, would create a repressive, violent theocracy in which the government and religion are one and the same.

I would remind you that our nation was founded by those who wished to escape such a state-run religion. Kudos to Mrs. Hammers for seeing what was being said without being said explicitly. I do like the Scripture the writer quotes, John 9:39 "Jesus said, 'I entered this world to render judgement - to give sight to the blind.'" But I believe you have it backward, assuming Mrs. Hammers to be blind. When Jesus walked the Earth, who was it he walked among? It was the murderers, the harlots, the lepers. He preached the gospel to the lost "to give sight to the blind."

And when Jesus went to the temple of the Pharisees, he referred to the priest as a "generation of vipers" for the spectacle they had made of religion, with their opulent building and their "proclaiming the truth from the rooftops." (To show those who think they see that they are blind.)

The Bible has two main messages: one of love, hope and salvation and the other of judgment, vengeance and damnation.

The first message is the part that Jesus taught us that we love (even our enemies) and give hope to reach salvation. The second message is ascribed to the Lord (vengeance is mine, saith the Lord).

Christians are wrong when they presume to try to enact the things which are the purview of the Lord. It is for us to love. It is for the Lord to judge.

Alice Peters, Victoria